Monarch Center for Autism Cleveland Ohio

References

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  2. Shane, H.C. (2006); Using visual scene displays to improve communication instruction in persons with autism spectrum disorders. Special Interest Division 12, Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Vol. 15, No. 1, 7-13.
  3. Shane H.C., Weiss-Kapp S., Visual language in autism. San Diego: Plural Publishing, 2007.
  4. Shane, H.C. & Simmons, M. (2001). Supports to Enhance Communication and Improving Problem Behaviors, Annual Convention, American Speech-Language Hearing Association, New Orleans, Louisiana.
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  6. National Research Council. (2001). Educating children with autism. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
  7. Shane H.C., Weiss-Kapp S., Visual language in autism. San Diego: Plural Publishing, 2007.
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  11. Shane, H.C., Kearns, K. & Weiss-Kapp, S. (2005), San Diego. A paper presented at the American Speech & Hearing Conference using the PAIRS System at Monarch School for Children with Autism.
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  30. Althaus, M., de Sonneville, L.M., Minderaa, R.B., Hensen, L.G., and Til, R.B. (1996). Information processing and aspects of visual attention in children with the DSM-III-R diagnosis “Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified” (PDDNOS): II. sustained attention. Child Neuropsychology, 2(1), 17-29.
  31. Althaus, M., de Sonneville, L.M., Minderaa, R.B., Hensen, L.G., and Til, R.B. (1996). Information processing and aspects of visual attention in children with the DSM-III-R diagnosis “Pervasive Developmental Disorder Not Otherwise Specified” (PDDNOS): II. sustained attention. Child Neuropsychology, 2(1), 30-38.
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  43. Kearns, K., Shane, H.C., Tourian, M. & Weiss-Kapp, S. (2004) Managing Autism Outcomes: The Participation, Accuracy, and Independence Scales, Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Philadelphia, PA.
  44. Kearns, K. & Shane, H.C. (2008). The Monarch Outcomes Management System. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Chicago, Illinois.
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  48. Rimland and Edelman; Autism Research Institute.
  49. World Health Organization (2000) International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health
 

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